A Good School – Richard Yates

a good schoolI am a total sucker for prep school stories, and A Good School doesn’t disappoint. Yates delves into the private lives of the prep school boys and their disillusioned professors without the pitfalls of sentimentality or melodrama. There is no doubt that the tales related in this novel are semi-autobiographical.

Set in early 1940s Connecticut at a second-tier boys’ school, Dorset Academy, A Good School mainly follows the newly-admitted-at-reduced-tuition Bill Grove. Pigeon-chested from a family of divorce, Grove is a lackluster student who only thrives while working on the school paper. So many adolescent concerns are addressed here: trying to break in as the “new kid,” wanting to be besties with another boy and not knowing how to handle it without being smothering, being smothered by another boy who thinks you’re the bees knees, all while trying to pass French and find a tuxedo for the dance. The sexual hazing is fierce at Dorset, and there is a touching scene with a boy and his father who are both trying to accept it and move past the humiliation. These stories all happen under the threatening future that as soon as they graduate, they will be fighting in the war.

There are several privileged rich boys at Dorset, but, much to the surprise of many professors, there are several boys in attendance from lower-income households as well. It comes as no surprise, then, that Dorset is in bankruptcy. These boys and their parents are clinging with a tenuous grasp to the idea that Dorset is still “a good school.”

This is mostly a coming-of-age tale, although Yates also includes the stories of some of the professors: the cuckolded handicapped professor, the nonchalant French professor doing the cuckolding, the sexual awakening of Dr. Stone’s blossoming daughter. These stories present a well-rounded view of Dorset Academy, but also touch on the human condition, and include the failings and unwitting triumphs of these men struggling to find purpose at a floundering institution.

The closure of the school, and the final chapters that focus on Bill Grove reminiscing about his time at Dorset, are under the shadow of a sense of resignation and anguish, but also nostalgia.

This a fun story with dark undertones. Highly recommended.

 

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s