The Waiter – Matias Faldbakken

the-waiter-9781501197529_hrI really didn’t know what star rating to give this. I enjoyed reading it, and there were some astute observations, some of which made me smile or chuckle, but as far as actual plot goes, there really wasn’t one. This book has been inaccurately likened to A Gentleman in Moscow, but it reminded me more of Nicholson Baker than Amor Towles.

The Waiter shows us a slice of life in the shabby yet historic restaurant, The Hills. The regulars come in at their usual times, and the waiter passes the time with his observations of their motives and facades of personality. There is also an endearing little girl, Anna, whose father frequently dumps her at the restaurant who charms the waiter and brings some joy into his mundane life.

I enjoyed the descriptions of the patrons, the wry humor, and nods to Old World sensibilities. It was an interesting book, but one I wouldn’t recommend to a casual reader as it is more about nuanced character interaction than plot.

Many thanks to Netgalley and Gallery / Scout Press for this advance copy in exchange for my review.

The Travelling Cat Chronicles – Hiro Arikawa

Nana, a stray cat named for his crooked tail that looks like the number 7, has no patience for:

  •             People trying to grab him from his carrier by his scruff
  •             Humans chastising him for not eating what he kills
  •             Being pet on his tail
  •             Other cats

Nana, however, is loyally bonded to Saturo ─ no other human understands Nana like Saturo does. Saturo also adores Nana, but for reasons not initially revealed, he is on quest to find Nana a new home. Saturo and Nana embark on a journey, and Nana discovers the friends of Saturo’s past and the hardships Saturo endured before adopting him.

cat

The Travelling Cat Chronicles appealed to what I love about cats ─ their haughty independence, their tenacious loyalty, and their finicky inability to be appeased. I also appreciated the Japanese setting that explored the beauty of the country as well as the culture of daily life that was new to me.

Told from Nana’s perspective, this book was amusing with quips that will charm cat lovers. I’ve always thought that each cat has a Person ─ the one they bond to, the one they love above all others. Saturo is Nana’s Person, forever, no matter what happens.

Many stars for this book.

Thanks to Penguin’s First to Read program for the advance copy in exchange for my review.